rhydonmyhardon
blondebarbells:

yasha9:

plantbaby420:

*mic drop*

Or you could, like, you know, just be happy that someone’s making an effort towards rape prevention. But yeah, let’s complain that it’s not perfect, that’s good.

This isn’t a complaint at all- it’s simply saying that instead of coming up with every “inventive anti rape” device under the sun, people need to start paying attention to the real problem- stopping rapists from raping.
I think it’s great that four college men came up work this product-it’s a great deal of chemistry and hard work that went into this project. I commend them. I really do think that it’s a step in the right direction.
But there are a few dangerous misconceptions that women face, when it comes to rape, that anti-rape products like these don’t help.
1. That women are most often raped by strangers.
This is simply not correct. It does happen, but not in the frequency that some people seem to think- a staggering. 66% of rapes and 75% of sexual assaults are committed by someone who the victim knows. 
No amount of color-changing nail polish, pepper spray, cat eyes key chains, rape whistles, etc will be effective if you’re not on the defensive. If you’re just hanging at a friends house. If you’re at work. If you’re with your partner. These products are all great, but only if you’re expecting to use them. If you’re at ease with people that you know around you, then what? 
2. That if a woman is raped, it’s her fault.
Was she dressed modestly? Had she had sex before? Was she drunk? Was she out at night? Was she carrying a rape whistle? Pepper spray? Anti rape nail polish?
After a woman is raped there are many questions, but the blame is often times put on the woman for not avoiding the rape. Nothing justifies raping another person. If a drunk woman walking naked alone at night in the street gets raped, it should be taken just as seriously as a woman “doing everything right” with her pepper spray in hand and keys between her fingers like little knives. Both were violated and both deserve to be treated with respect. But how would the media report these? Very, very differently. Because the responsibility of the rape is rarely put on the rapist- but rather what the woman was doing, or should have been doing, to protect herself.
Here’s the bottom line- these products are great for personal safety, for personal awareness. I carry every protection product you can think of. There are a lot of great products out there, and if it makes you feel more protected, and if it makes you feel like you could escape an attack- by all means, USE these products!
But this does not solve the problem. The problem is that so long as people are not taught what consent really means, and are taught NOT TO RAPE- all the anti-rape products in the world won’t stop rapists.
I’d encourage everyone to read this awesome article, which makes many points on why this is great, but there is so much more to be done. Also linked to some stats on rapists.
http://mic.com/articles/97362/11-ways-to-solve-rape-better-than-nail-polish
https://rainn.org/get-information/statistics/sexual-assault-offenders
From the article:
“Encouraging women to buy products to make themselves safer is sort of like cutting off the weed at its stem, instead of at its root: It might give you something to do, but you aren’t going to actually eradicate weeds from your garden. To stop rape, we need to teach men not to rape, not teach women that it’s their responsibility to prevent it.” (Elizabeth Plank)

blondebarbells:

yasha9:

plantbaby420:

*mic drop*

Or you could, like, you know, just be happy that someone’s making an effort towards rape prevention. But yeah, let’s complain that it’s not perfect, that’s good.

This isn’t a complaint at all- it’s simply saying that instead of coming up with every “inventive anti rape” device under the sun, people need to start paying attention to the real problem- stopping rapists from raping.

I think it’s great that four college men came up work this product-it’s a great deal of chemistry and hard work that went into this project. I commend them. I really do think that it’s a step in the right direction.

But there are a few dangerous misconceptions that women face, when it comes to rape, that anti-rape products like these don’t help.

1. That women are most often raped by strangers.

This is simply not correct. It does happen, but not in the frequency that some people seem to think- a staggering. 66% of rapes and 75% of sexual assaults are committed by someone who the victim knows. 

No amount of color-changing nail polish, pepper spray, cat eyes key chains, rape whistles, etc will be effective if you’re not on the defensive. If you’re just hanging at a friends house. If you’re at work. If you’re with your partner. These products are all great, but only if you’re expecting to use them. If you’re at ease with people that you know around you, then what? 

2. That if a woman is raped, it’s her fault.

Was she dressed modestly? Had she had sex before? Was she drunk? Was she out at night? Was she carrying a rape whistle? Pepper spray? Anti rape nail polish?

After a woman is raped there are many questions, but the blame is often times put on the woman for not avoiding the rape. Nothing justifies raping another person. If a drunk woman walking naked alone at night in the street gets raped, it should be taken just as seriously as a woman “doing everything right” with her pepper spray in hand and keys between her fingers like little knives. Both were violated and both deserve to be treated with respect. But how would the media report these? Very, very differently. Because the responsibility of the rape is rarely put on the rapist- but rather what the woman was doing, or should have been doing, to protect herself.

Here’s the bottom line- these products are great for personal safety, for personal awareness. I carry every protection product you can think of. There are a lot of great products out there, and if it makes you feel more protected, and if it makes you feel like you could escape an attack- by all means, USE these products!

But this does not solve the problem. The problem is that so long as people are not taught what consent really means, and are taught NOT TO RAPE- all the anti-rape products in the world won’t stop rapists.

I’d encourage everyone to read this awesome article, which makes many points on why this is great, but there is so much more to be done. Also linked to some stats on rapists.

http://mic.com/articles/97362/11-ways-to-solve-rape-better-than-nail-polish

https://rainn.org/get-information/statistics/sexual-assault-offenders

From the article:

Encouraging women to buy products to make themselves safer is sort of like cutting off the weed at its stem, instead of at its root: It might give you something to do, but you aren’t going to actually eradicate weeds from your garden. To stop rape, we need to teach men not to rape, not teach women that it’s their responsibility to prevent it.” (Elizabeth Plank)

rhydonmyhardon

micdotcom:

11 ways to solve rape better than nail polish

The more we depend on women to prevent rape, the easier it is to blame them when it happens to them. Here’s a look at the well-documented ways we can actually stop rape. Maybe it’s time we invest a little more time and resources into implementing them before we send gallons of nail polish to colleges across the country.

Read the full list | Follow micdotcom

betterbemeta

In the post-World War II era, the Klan experienced a huge resurgence. Its membership was skyrocketing, and its political influence was increasing, so Kennedy went undercover to infiltrate the group. By regularly attending meetings, he became privy to the organization’s secrets. But when he took the information to local authorities, they had little interest in using it. The Klan had become so powerful and intimidating that police were hesitant to build a case against them.

Struggling to make use of his findings, Kennedy approached the writers of the Superman radio serial. It was perfect timing. With the war over and the Nazis no longer a threat, the producers were looking for a new villain for Superman to fight. The KKK was a great fit for the role.

In a 16-episode series titled “Clan of the Fiery Cross,” the writers pitted the Man of Steel against the men in white hoods. As the storyline progressed, the shows exposed many of the KKK’s most guarded secrets. By revealing everything from code words to rituals, the program completely stripped the Klan of its mystique. Within two weeks of the broadcast, KKK recruitment was down to zero. And by 1948, people were showing up to Klan rallies just to mock them.

How Superman Defeated the Ku Klux Klan | Mental Floss (via sarkos)

image 

I ain’t the world’s best writer nor the world’s best speller
But when I believe in something I’m the loudest yeller

“Stetson Kennedy,” Woody Guthrie

(via wolfpangs)

If Woody Guthrie wrote a song about your merits, you freaking HAD them.

(via delcat)

Stetson Kennedy: American Badass.

(via underscorex)

oomshi
wertheyouth:

When an undercover officer saw Monica Jones, a black transgender woman, walking down the street just a few blocks from her house, in an area that the officer described as being “known for prostitution,” that was enough to convince him that she intended to engage in prostitution. It was on that basis that he approached and stopped her.
In April of this year, Monica was convicted of violating this overbroad and vague law. Today she appeals that conviction, and the ACLU, along with other advocacy and civil rights organizations, filed a brief in support of her appeal.
We #StandWithMonica because transgender women of color should be able to walk down the street in their neighborhoods without being arrested, or worse, for simply being themselves.
When Walking Down the Street is a Crime. Chase Strangio, ACLU

wertheyouth:

When an undercover officer saw Monica Jones, a black transgender woman, walking down the street just a few blocks from her house, in an area that the officer described as being “known for prostitution,” that was enough to convince him that she intended to engage in prostitution. It was on that basis that he approached and stopped her.

In April of this year, Monica was convicted of violating this overbroad and vague law. Today she appeals that conviction, and the ACLU, along with other advocacy and civil rights organizations, filed a brief in support of her appeal.

We #StandWithMonica because transgender women of color should be able to walk down the street in their neighborhoods without being arrested, or worse, for simply being themselves.

When Walking Down the Street is a Crime. Chase Strangio, ACLU

alwaysbethereforyou

foxnewsofficial:

cumomelet:

a riddle:

a man is driving his son to school. they get into an accident and the man dies. the son is rushed to the hospital and when he arrives for emergency surgery the doctor says “i cant operate on this boy, he is my son!” how is this possible?

omg one time our english teacher told us this to try and show what a modern thinker he was and we were all like “it’s a woman” and he was like oh wow i thought he was gay i hadn’t thought of that